Santana Visa 1989

Santana Visa 1989

Features

Santana Visa from 1989, steele frame, size L, 20 kg complete, 25,000 k. Speed up to 80k/h downhill, on flat roads average 30 k/h. We ride it between 22 and 25 k/h depending on training and elevation profile.
  • Frame: Santana Visa from 1989, steele frame, 20 kg complete. Made about 25,000 k. Bought 2011 with 12,000 k done, newly painted, by 2014 another 13,000 k. Back wheel with a 140 mm hub, old Santana width. With our new hub in 145 mm we had to bend up the bracket a bit.
  • Wheels: rims from Mavic, Swiss D2 Competition spokes, max. 32 mm tires, which is good enough for the most roads in Europe. Tire from Contitravel/Conti or Schwalbe Marathon, tube from Schwalbe.

  • Brakes: Avid v-brakes, additional Arai drum-brake for longer decents with luggage. The Arai is a holding brake. You can regulate the brake resistance from the handle bar. Due to the construction the brake derives the heat during braking quite well. The heat does not reach the rim, so other than a v-brake, constant braking with the Arai does not lead to bursting tires. In comparison to a disc brake, the Arai is almost indestructible
  • Gearing: set of 7 pinions, chain ring 52-38-28, Shimamo handle bar end-gearing. We have a couple of pinions on stock as the production will be terminated one day.
  • Saddle: Aesculap and Terry
  • Electricity and Light: SON 28 classic 40 whole, B+M light, B+M E-Werk
  • Luggage: Tubus rack. Bags from Ortlieb and Vaude. The Vaude back bags are 4 litres bigger than the Ortlieb bags. And we prefer their closing system.

Experiences with the Santana Visa

This is our first tandem bike. It still runs smooth and easy compared to other brands we have tried. Although it is relatively old, we are still happy with it. Biggest problem we had was the break down of the spokes including the holder on the hub, which happened during our trip through the Baltic states. We could not get a spare Edco hub during the tour. Even back in Germany we only found one dealer who still had the fitting part for us. A second issue is the width of the hub. Meanwhile Santana uses 160 mm, but we needed 140 mm. “Normal” hubs are not strong enough to carry the weight of a tandem including luggage and trailer. During the trip we improvised by twisting the spoeks around each other and cycled about 300 k with it. In Klaipeda we bought the stronges wheel available, which lastesd about 300 k. With our new Edco hub our Visa runs perfectly again.

Santana Fusion 1996

Santana Fusion 1996

Features

Santana Fusion 1996 CroMo, size M, 18 kg. A tough touring bike. Optimal combination with the suspended Bob-Ibex trailer for rough and bumpy roads. The transmission ratio is suitable for hills and long uphill rides.
  • Santana Fusion / Cilantro MTB- or touring bike.
  • Frame: size M (front 51 cm, back 46 cm), CroMo, 18 kg
  • Wheels: 26”, 40 holes, back Mavic D521 , front Velocity Atlas, Swiss Competition D2. Conti Travelcontact 1,75, tube Schwalbe
  • Saddles: Aesculap, stoker seat post = Suntour
  • Breaks: Avid with Kool Stop V-brakes red. They do not squeek and have a good grip. Good for the rim, if you clean the brakes every now and then (remove metal splinters) Extra – Arai drum-brake

  • Gearing: Deore XT. 2x TA chain ring 38 left, TA Zephyr 24-36-48, pinion Shimano 9 speed 11-34. We chose this gearing especially for long, steep mountain stages with full luggage and trailer.
  • Electricity and light: Busch and Müller Lumotec IQ Cyo T super bright, SON classic Tandem, E-Werk
  • Trailer: Bob Ibex suspended with selfmade poles to use it upside down as a table.
  • Luggage: Tubus Cosmo luggage rack (back), Tara Lowrider (front). Ortlieb (Handle bar bag front, front wheel bags), Vaude (handle bar bag back, back wheel bags) The back wheel bags from Vaude have a 4 litre bigger volume compared to Ortlieb. Ortlieb rackpack M for photo equipment

Experience with the Santana Fusion:

Rough roads are no problem for the Santana Fusion, thanks to the wider tubes. The Visa is the bike for smoother streets. Uphill the Fusion is easier to ride compared to the Visa because of the gear reduction. 15% slopes are feasible, although quite slow. But this gives us time to have a look around and admire the flowers.

Trailer Bob Yak

Trailer Bob Yak

Features

BOB Yak Trailer, CroMo-steel, weight 6.1 kg, 32 kg load capacity, loading area: 62 x 40 cm, 16 inch wheel, flag pole, mudguard, reflector
  • We own the Bob Yak since the mid-eighties. Original colour was black, we changed it to match our red Visa-tandem. It has served us loyally through Spain, Portugal, France, Great Britain, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Austria and Hungary.
  • The trailer can be disassembled for flights. You can take off the tow bar, the wheel and the mudguard. Waterproof bags for the luggage are supplied by Bob themselves or Ortlieb.
  • In comparison to a two-lane trailer a single wheel trailer runs much easier and smoother. The lack of a suspension is a downside when travelling on rougher roads. Although it is lighter than the suspended trailer, we highly recommend a suspension.
 

Trailer Bob Ibex

Trailer Bob Ibex

Features

BOB IBEX, Smooth suspension for tough tours, suspension from 6-32 kg load, loading area 62 x 40 cm, wheel: 16“, weight 7,7 kg, ChroMo steel, 4 bottle holders possible

Smooth suspension for tough tours

The difference to the Bob Yak ist significant. The Bob Ibex is cross-country capable without any rattling. Due to the suspension the load is carried carefully. Depending on the weight of the load the suspension can be adjusted between 6 and 32 kg. Presumable it is even better for the tandem axis if the trailer is suspended.

Bob Ibex Details

Bob Ibex Details

Technical details:
  • Load area 62 x 40 cm plus wheel
  • Wheel: 16“
  • Load: max. 32 kg
  • Weight: 7.7 kg
  • Material: ChroMo-steel
  • Flag, mudgaurd with self made holder for back light
  • 4 bottleholders possible
Disadvantage: The trailer is heavier than the Yak, due to the suspension. We fixed two metal poles between the bottle holders and the frame. They serve as table legs when we turn the trailer upside down to use it as a table. The piece of water hose we fixed on the front end of the frame keeps the metal from getting scratched while used as table. Normally we use a wax table cloth to have a nice and kleen table top.